Archive for Music - page 3

Pre-Music Friday New Year’s Day Edition

Pre-Music Friday New Year’s Day Edition

This is marginally related to tomorrow’s Music Friday post.  How you ask?  Go ahead.  Ask nice.  What’s the magic word?  Anyway…I’m not telling.  You’ll have to come back tomorrow to find out.  Meanwhile – enjoy some of Paul McCartney’s home movies:

You’re Welcome!

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

We can close the books on another year – I hope 2014 treated you all well enough.  For me it was not the best of times, nor was it the worst of times and so I can’t complain too loudly.  It’s not that I don’t like to whine, you’ve all heard it often enough.  I’ll try to save it for when it really counts.  So here’s to a hopeful look forward to 2015 – may it be a Happy, Healthy, Prosperous year for us all!

Happy_New_Year_Charlie_Brown-1

Post-Christmas Music Friday – 1970 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

Post-Christmas Music Friday – 1970 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

Thanks for waiting two weeks for the latest post in my quest to determine my “Peak Music Year”.  Get more background here  and here if you wish.  My task is to examine the BillBoard Hot 100 music charts for the years 1965 through 1975 to see if I can pinpoint the year that most influenced my taste in music.  This installment brings us to the year 1970.  And awaaaay we go!

You can see the 1970 BillBoard Hot 100 Chart for yourself here.  My first impression is that Pop Music, or what we used to call “bubblegum pop” seems to be emerging as a dominant genre, with more than half the #1’s fitting that description.  Indeed the group with the most #1’s in 1970 are the poster children for pop music, with one of those children eventually earning the title “The King of Pop”.  They are the “winners” of 1970 with four #1’s, The Jackson 5  which of course featured Michael Jackson.  The runners up with only two #1’s in 1970 are – no surprise here – The Beatles.  I’ll show you the four #1 Jackson 5 songs, but before I do I have to say that right off the bat I think I can eliminate 1970 as my peak music year.  Chronologically it might have been a good candidate as it was the year I entered High School and was well into my adolescence which seems like a good time for a person to bond emotionally with music.  However, after perusing the chart I find no songs that really made an impression on me.  Even the Beatles’ #1’s that year, including the iconic Let It Be, aren’t among my favorite tunes though there are some tunes whose titles one would recognize, including Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel.

OK, back to The Jackson 5.  They had four #1’s in 1970:

First up – it’s got a good beat and you can dance to it – I Want You Back

Next up  – bubblegum, anyone?  ABC

Third up – The Love You Save / Found That Girl.  Huh.  Forgot about that one.

And fourth, probably my favorite of the bunch, the ballad I’ll Be There

So in conclusion, 1970 is most likely not my peak music year, and possibly a year the marks a turning point in the culture away from the counterculture and rock music that dominated most of the 1960s to more commercial pop music. What do you think?

 

 

 

Sunday Music Friday – Postscript Edition

Sunday Music Friday – Postscript Edition

Too many good songs on the 1969 BillBoard Hot 100 to cover in only two posts.  So here’s the PS – which I could have entitled “Music Friday – Unrequited Love Edition”.  This is dedicated – ala Casey Kasem – to the unrequited lovers of the world.  You know who you are:

 

Have a great week!  Love to all!

Saturday Music Friday – 1969 BillBoard Hot 100 Overflow Edition

Saturday Music Friday – 1969 BillBoard Hot 100 Overflow Edition

In the  1969Billboard Hot 100 post I noted that nearly all the #1 songs that year were (are?) really great songs – some by lesser known artists and others  by music icons.  Click the link here for the chart and see for yourself.  Of the seventeen songs that reached #1 that year, all but a handfull are commonly heard today in heavy rotation on classic rock or oldies stations.  And because there are so many, I felt that I should feature a few of them besides the “winners” I posted yesterday.  A couple of them (in addition to the two that I mentioned in yesterday’s post) I had featured in earlier posts:  Henry Mancini’s Love Theme From Romeo and Juliet,  and Every Day People by Sly and The Family Stone.  OK.  So I have established that I like these songs, therefore they are “great”.  Whether you like them or not, you will have to agree with me that one of them is universally known and heard even today in movies, in commercials and of course on the radio or streaming media.  It’s been covered by many successful mainstream artists.  I doubt that more than a day or two goes by without one hearing it in some form somewhere.  If you’ve looked at the chart, you can probably guess which one I’m talking about:  I Heard It Through The Grapevine by Marvin Gaye:

Oh, yeah.  That’s some R&B right there.  Alright.  Next up is a song that nearly defines the band that recorded it, a band that is one of the most successful of all time and is still recording and touring today with nearly their original lineup.  Pretty amazing, considering that this song hit #1 just a little over 35 years ago.  The song and band?  Honky Tonk Women by The Rolling Stones:

So there you have it.  1969 was a very good year.  And perhaps….my peak music year.  We shall see.

Music Friday – 1969 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

Music Friday – 1969 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

Hello everyone.  Sorry to make you wait two weeks for this installment in my project to discern my Peak Music Year.  It won’t happen again.  Unless it does.  Anyhoo, here goes.  We are now up to 1969 – if you wish to catch up on 1965-1968 you can just scroll down, down and further down or click here for 1965, here for 1966, here for 1967 and here for 1968.  I’ll wait while you get caught up……all caught up or don’t care?  Well, you must care at least a little or you wouldn’t be reading this far.  So good.

Let’s go:  the 1969 BillBoard Hot 100.

I have a feeling that this may be my peak music year simply by looking at the roster of #1 songs and seeing how many of these are among my favorites and are songs that are currently in my collection, on my playlists, or have been featured on my blogs as a Music Friday subject or as part of another post.  Of the 17 different songs that charted at #1 in 1969, I regularly listen to 15 of them.  The two exceptions are Sugar, Sugar by The Archies (who were not even a real band) and In The Year 2525 by Zager and Evans, though the latter is somewhat of a classic in it’s own right and was the subject of a previous Music Friday post.  Another surprise – The Beatles don’t win walking away.  It’s kind of a tie with The 5th Dimension since both groups had two #1 songs that year.  The 5th Dimension edge out The Beatles slightly in total weeks at #1 since their two songs spent a total of nine weeks at #1, and The Beatles’ two songs spent a total of 6 weeks at number one.  However…I am going to have to call it for The Beatles, because of the iconic status of their #1’s.  While The 5th Dimension’s songs, though representative of the music of the period, are really just footnotes to the history while the Beatles’ tunes are the history.  So the winner is…..drumroll…..The Beatles!  Big Surprise, I know.  I also know that I haven’t told you the titles of the songs.  Don’t worry – I’ll tell you the titles and you can listen to them too.  I’ll present all four songs – two by The Beatles, and two by The 5th Dimension and you tell me if I made the right choice.

I’ll do this like they do the Miss America Pageant – we’ll start with the “runners up”.  Should the winners be unable to fulfill their obligation, the runners up will be named the winner.  Not really, but I’ve always wanted to say (write?) that.  Here goes:

Second runner up is The 5th Dimension’s Wedding Bell Blues, sometmes A.K.A. Marry Me Bill:

First runner up is The 5th Dimension’s Age of Aquarius / Let The Sun Shine In which I featured in a previous blog post titled Was That The Dawning Of The Age Of Aquarius?

Not bad, but when was the last time you heard either one of those songs?  Not recently, I bet unless you are me.  And you’re not.  Now for the Winners:  The Beatles’ (featuring Billy Preston on keyboards) Get Back which spent six weeks at #1:

And The Beatles’ Come Together / Something which spent only one week at the top spot in 1969.  What I don’t understand is that the BillBoard chart lists as a medley what I believe are two individual songs, even though two songs can’t share the number one spot.  Or can they?  Anyway, here are both songs :

 

So there you have it.  1969 winners are The Beatles.  They are on a roll…a rock and roll?  Sorry, bad pun.  But they’re looking hard to beat, but since they broke up in 1970 they can’t win more than one more year.  And 1971 – 1975 will be wide open!  Hope you enjoyed…stay tuned for the obligatory encore post following right behind this one.  Or right above this one.  Or something.

Explanation (Excuse?) for Light (Non-Existent?) Blogging

Explanation (Excuse?) for Light (Non-Existent?) Blogging

I owe my legions of faithful readers an explanation for my long absence from the keyboard *eyeroll*.  I have recently become un-involutarily retired.  In other words, I found a job.  So yay.  And the Blogs have taken the back burner.  In fact they’ve been in the freezer.  I’m going to do my best to keep them going, but I’m still trying to find time to schedule all the things that filled my life during my long involuntary retirement.  Don’t Worry!  I’ll work it out!  Things may  lighten up after the Holidays.  Please be patient.

Music Friday – 1968 Number One Weirdness Edition

Music Friday – 1968 Number One Weirdness Edition

In my previous post I mentioned that on the 1968 BillBoard Hot 100 chart there were five songs that each spent four consecutive weeks or more at #1.  And in keeping with the weirdness of the time, there were some good ones and some  weird ones.  You know me well enough by now to know that you are about to hear….

The weird (five weeks at #1):

The less weird (four weeks at #1):

The sweet (five weeks at #1):

And the stereotypical 60’s (five weeks at #1):

Natural situation for a man to be free.  Damn straight.  Til next time…Peace In the Valley!

Music Friday – 1968 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

Music Friday – 1968 BillBoard Hot 100 Edition

The project to determine my peak music year continues this week with a look at the 1968 BillBoard Hot 100.  If you want to recap 1965, 66 and 67 you can click here.

For the first time so far in this endeavor, the winner of the round not only had the most songs at the #1 position, but also the most overall time spent at #1 as well.  1968 was an interesting year, as there were five individual songs that each spent four consecutive weeks or more at #1, not including one of the songs by this year’s winner that spent nine consecutive weeks at #1.  Dying of suspense?  OK, I’ll have mercy and announce the winner as…The Beatles!  Somewhat anti-climactic, isn’t it?  The Beatles had two songs that made #1 in 1968;  Hello Goodbye which spent 2 weeks at #1 (after having spent time at #1 the previous year also) and Hey Jude which spent an amazing nine consecutive weeks at #1.  So here you go.

Hello Goodbye, two weeks at #1

And Hey Jude, nine weeks at #1

Another interesting thing about Hey Jude is that it bucked the AM Radio format of the two and a half minute song, as it clocked in at a little over seven minutes, almost four minutes of which is “Na Na Na Na-na-na-na”.  As I mentioned in one of the earlier posts, it is possible The Beatles dominated the chart until their breakup in 1970 (I don’t know for sure – I have not cheated and looked ahead).  They’ve won every year now 1965 through 68.  I guess we’ll find out together.

I mentioned that there were five songs that each spent four consecutive weeks or more at #1.  One of them is instantly recognizable as one of the best songs of the sixties…period.  I’ll just tell you the name of the artist:  Otis Redding.  Now listen:

A note of irony in that the song did not reach #1 until after Otis Redding’s death that year in a plane crash, the first posthumous #1 song in BillBoard Hot 100 history.  Too bad.

Oh…also…Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay is two minutes and forty two seconds long.  So it also bucked the two-and-a-half minute format.  Just by a lot less.   See you next week when we wrap up the sixties with The 1969 BillBoard Hot 100.  See ya!

Music Friday – Make Good Edition

Music Friday – Make Good Edition

I owe someone an apology.  That someone is…or rather those someones are The Young Rascals.  In the last post I omitted them from the groups that had songs that spent four weeks at #1 on the 1967 BillBoard Hot 100.  Their song Groovin’ spent four weeks at #1, though not consecutively.  It was at #1 for two weeks on two occasions for a total of four weeks.  So four weeks.  Here you go:

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